The port Chicago 50: disaster, mutiny, and the fight for civil rights

940.54 S543p 2017

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The port Chicago 50: disaster, mutiny, and the fight for civil rights

Sheinkin, Steve

New York Roaring Brook Press 2013

200 p. illus. 24 cm.

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In San Francisco Bay, there was a United States Navy base called Port Chicago. During World War II, it was a busy port where young sailors--many of them teenagers--loaded bombs and ammunition into ships bound for American troops in the Pacific. Like the entire Navy, Port Chicago was strictly segregated. All the officers giving orders were white; all the men loading bombs were black. On July 17, 1944, a massive explosion rocked Port Chicago, killing 320 servicemen and injuring hundreds more. Surviving black sailors were taken to a nearby base and ordered to return to the same exact work. More than 200 of the men refused unless the unsafe and unfair conditions at the docks were addressed. The sailors called it standing up for justice. The navy called it mutiny and threatened that anyone not immediately returning to work would face the firing squad. Most of the men agreed to back down. Fifty did not.

Available

RegularRegular

1 copy available at Collegedale Academy

ISBN:

9781596437968

Author:

Sheinkin, Steve

Title:

The port Chicago 50: disaster, mutiny, and the fight for civil rights

Publisher:

New York Roaring Brook Press 2013

Physical:

200 p. illus. 24 cm.

Summary:

In San Francisco Bay, there was a United States Navy base called Port Chicago. During World War II, it was a busy port where young sailors--many of them teenagers--loaded bombs and ammunition into ships bound for American troops in the Pacific. Like the entire Navy, Port Chicago was strictly segregated. All the officers giving orders were white; all the men loading bombs were black. On July 17, 1944, a massive explosion rocked Port Chicago, killing 320 servicemen and injuring hundreds more. Surviving black sailors were taken to a nearby base and ordered to return to the same exact work. More than 200 of the men refused unless the unsafe and unfair conditions at the docks were addressed. The sailors called it standing up for justice. The navy called it mutiny and threatened that anyone not immediately returning to work would face the firing squad. Most of the men agreed to back down. Fifty did not.

Subject:

World war, 1939-1945--Participation, African American--Juvenile literature

Subject:

Port Chicago Mutiny, Port Chicago, Calif., 1944--Juvenile literature--1944

Subject:

Port Chicago Mutiny Trial, San Francisco, Calif., 1944--Juvenile literature

Subject:

United States. Navy--African Americans--History

Subject:

African American sailors--History--20th century

Field Ind Subfield Data
001 Control No     15268
005 LastTransaction     20170830125041.0
020 ISBN   $a ISBN  9781596437968
035 System Ctrl No   $a System control number  12316
100 ME:PersonalName   $a Personal name  Sheinkin, Steve
245 Title $a Title  The port Chicago 50: disaster, mutiny, and the fight for civil rights
260 PublicationInfo   $a Place of publication, dist.  New York
    $b Name of publisher, dist, etc  Roaring Brook Press
    $c Date of publication, dist, etc  2013
300 Physical Desc   $a Extent  200 p.
    $b Other physical details  illus.
    $c Dimensions  24 cm.
520 Summary   $a Summary, etc. note  In San Francisco Bay, there was a United States Navy base called Port Chicago. During World War II, it was a busy port where young sailors--many of them teenagers--loaded bombs and ammunition into ships bound for American troops in the Pacific. Like the entire Navy, Port Chicago was strictly segregated. All the officers giving orders were white; all the men loading bombs were black. On July 17, 1944, a massive explosion rocked Port Chicago, killing 320 servicemen and injuring hundreds more. Surviving black sailors were taken to a nearby base and ordered to return to the same exact work. More than 200 of the men refused unless the unsafe and unfair conditions at the docks were addressed. The sailors called it standing up for justice. The navy called it mutiny and threatened that anyone not immediately returning to work would face the firing squad. Most of the men agreed to back down. Fifty did not.
650 Subj:Topic   $a Topical term  World war, 1939-1945
    $x General subdivision  Participation, African American
    $x General subdivision  Juvenile literature
650 Subj:Topic   $a Topical term  Port Chicago Mutiny, Port Chicago, Calif., 1944
    $x General subdivision  Juvenile literature
    $x General subdivision  1944
650 Subj:Topic   $a Topical term  Port Chicago Mutiny Trial, San Francisco, Calif., 1944
    $x General subdivision  Juvenile literature
650 Subj:Topic   $a Topical term  United States. Navy
    $x General subdivision  African Americans
    $x General subdivision  History
650 Subj:Topic   $a Topical term  African American sailors
    $x General subdivision  History
    $x General subdivision  20th century
852 Holdings   $a Location  CAA
    $h Classification part  940.54 S543p 2017
    $p Barcode  21877
    $9 Cost  $12.99

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