World History Ancient to 1776

Posted by Admin on November 18, 2015

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    1177 B.C.: the year civilization collapsed

    930.1
    C641o
    2015

    1177 B.C.: the year civilization collapsed

    Cline, Eric H.

    In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy defeated them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Myceneans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millenium B.C. suddenly ceased to exist. How did it happen?

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    The adventures of cabeza de vaca: the lost conquistador

    970.01
    H417a
    2015

    The adventures of cabeza de vaca: the lost conquistador

    Hayes, Tom

    Cabeza de Vaca was looking for adventure when he helped lead a group of Spanish explorers to North America in 1528, and he certainly found it when he washed up on the shores of Texas. Lost in the wilderness with his men and living among the Indians, he survived as a wandering merchant, a warrior-prince, a slave, a medicine man and a faith healer. Durin his epic jounrey across North America he gathered up thousands of native followers as people from village after village just walked away from their homes and left all of their possessions behind in order to follow him. He surprised the world when he came walking out of the wilderness with three of his companions and this great procession of natives after being presumed dead for nearly eight years. Join this fearless explorer on a compelling spiritual journey across an unexplored stone-age America.

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    Africans and their history

    967
    H313a
    2015

    Africans and their history

    Harris, Joseph

    The truth about Africa's heritage is as complex and compelling as it is elusive. This concise overview is a major step toward understanding the diverse societies on the vast African continent, as it offers devastating documentation of the ways in which Western writers have distorted images of Africa and its people as far back as the Greco-Roman period. A superlative assemblage of the varied strands of black achievement dating from the proud era of early African civilizations, this book penetrates the myths and reveals a rich historical legacy. Incisive and authoritative, this invaluable work by a leading black scholar splendidly chronicles Africa's development and its relationship to the rest of the world.

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    The age of vikings

    948
    W758a
    2015

    The age of vikings

    Winroth, Anders

    The Vikings maintain their grip on our imagination, but their image is too often distorted by medieval and modern myth. It is true that they pillaged, looted, and enslaved. But they also settled peacefully and developed a vast trading network. They traveled far from their homelands in swift and sturdy ships, not only to raid, but also to explore. Despite their fearsome reputation, the Vikings didn't wear horned helmets, and even the infamous berserkers were far from invincible. By dismantling the myths, this book allows the full story of this period in medieval history to be told. By ecploring every major facet of this exciting age, Anders Winroth captures the innovation and pure daring of the Vikings with out glossing over their destructive image. He not only explains the Viking attacks, but also looks at the Viking endeavors in commerce, politics, discovery, and colonization, and reveals how Viking arts, literature, and religious thought evolved in ways unequaled in the rest of Europe. He shows how the Vikings seized on the boundless opportunities made possible by the invention of the longship, using it to venture to Europe for the plunder, to open new trade routes, and to settle in lands as distant as Russia, Greenland, and the Byzantine Empire. Challenging the image of the Vikings that comes so easily to mind, Winroth argues that Viking chieftains were no more violent than men like Charlemagne, who committed atrocities on a far greater scale than the northern raiders.

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    Aladdin's lamp: how greek science came to Europe through the Islamic world

    509
    F854a
    2015

    Aladdin's lamp: how greek science came to Europe through the Islamic world

    Freely, John

    This book is the fascinating story of how scholars in medieval Baghdad translated the works of Pythagoras, Plato, Aristotle, Euclid, Archimedes, Galen, Ptolemy, and others into Arabic, spreading their ideas throughout the Islamic world with many Muslim scientists, most notably Avicenna, Alhazen, and Averroes, adding their own interpretations to the philosophy and science they had inherited. Freely goes on to show how, beginning in the twelfth century, these texts by Islamic scholars were then translated from Arabic into Latin, sparking the emergence of modern science at the dawn of the Renaissance, which climaxed in the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century.

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    Alexander the Great

    92
    A855a
    2017

    Alexander the Great

    Freeman, Philip

    In the first authoritative biography of Alexander the Great written for a general audience in a generation, classicist and historian Philip Freeman tells the remarkable life of the great conqueror. The celebrated Macedonian king has been one of the most enduring figures in history. He was a general of such skill and renown that for two thousand years other great leaders studied his strategy and tactics, from Hannibal to Napoleon, with countless more in between. He flashed across the sky of history like a comet, glowing brightly and burning out quickly: crowned at age nineteen, dead by thirty-two. He established the greatest empire of the ancient world; Greek coins and statues are found as far east as Afghanistan. Our interest in him has never faded. Alexander was born into the royal family of Macedonia, the kingdom that would soon rule over Greece. Tutored as a boy by Aristotle, Alexander had an inquisitive mind that would serve him well when he faced formidable obstacles during his military campaigns. Shortly after taking command of the army, he launched an invasion of the Persian empire, and continued his conquests as far south as the deserts of Egypt and as far east as the mountains of present-day Pakistan and the plains of India. Alexander spent nearly all his adult life away from his homeland, and he and his men helped spread the Greek language throughout western Asia, where it would become the lingua franca of the ancient world. Within a short time after Alexander’s death in Baghdad, his empire began to fracture. Best known among his successors are the Ptolemies of Egypt, whose empire lasted until Cleopatra. In his lively and authoritative biography of Alexander, classical scholar and historian Philip Freeman describes Alexander’s astonishing achievements and provides insight into the mercurial character of the great conqueror. Alexander could be petty and magnanimous, cruel and merciful, impulsive and farsighted. Above all, he was ferociously, intensely competitive and could not tolerate losing—which he rarely did. As Freeman explains, without Alexander, the influence of Greece on the ancient world would surely not have been as great as it was, even if his motivation was not to spread Greek culture for beneficial purposes but instead to unify his empire. Only a handful of people have influenced history as Alexander did, which is why he continues to fascinate us.

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    Alexander the Great

    92
    A374f
    2015

    Alexander the Great

    Fox, Robin Lane

    Tough, resolute, fearless, a born warrior, lover of Homer, drama and hunting, Alexander was also an impatient man of passionate ambitions, who understood the intense adventure of the unknown. When he died at thiry-two, his empire--from Greece to India--comprised two million square miles, and the vacuum he left was never properly filled. He had excelled as a general, he had stamped the face of Greek culture on the ancient East and he had created a myth that is as potent today as it was then.

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    Alexander the Great: conqueror of the known world

    92
    A378n
    2012

    Alexander the Great: conqueror of the known world

    Nardo, Don.

    Alexander III of Macedonia, whom history came to call "the Great," was one of the most talented military generals who ever lived. By the time of his untimely death, at age thirty-two, in 323 BC, he had conquered an enormous portion of the known world. His empire stretched from Greece eastward to India and encompassed dozens of diverse people with separate languages and cultures. Few historical figures have been as widely feared, loved, hated, discussed, and immortalized in human memory as he.

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    Amazing rare things: the art of natural history in the age of discovery

    508.022
    A883a
    2009

    Amazing rare things: the art of natural history in the age of discovery

    Attenborough, David.

    Describes the methods by which selected European artists, from Leonardo Da Vinci to Mark Catesby, portrayed the natural world during the Age of Discovery.

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    Ancient China

    609.31
    S671ac
    2010

    Ancient China

    Snedden, Robert.

    Looks at civilizations in the ancient and medieval worlds and explains the technological advances made in those times. Each book presents a clear insight into the way people lived and shows examples of how some of those ancient technologies have developed, and are still in use, in today's world.

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    Ancient Greece

    609.38
    S671ag
    2010

    Ancient Greece

    Snedden, Robert.

    Looks at civilizations in the ancient and medieval worlds and explains the technological advances made in those times. Each book presents a clear insight into the way people lived and shows examples of how some of those ancient technologies have developed, and are still in use, in today's world.

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    Ancient Mexico

    972
    S819a
    2011

    Ancient Mexico

    Stein, R. Conrad.

    The accomplishments of the ancient societies are remarkable: The Maya were some of the greatest mathematicians in all of antiquity anf the Aztecs were among the finest engineers and builders. The period of ancient Mexico ended int he 1520s when Spaniards arrived from Europe and conquered the Aztecs. Today, ancient Mexico looms as a fascinating historical epoch filled with mystery and triumph.

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    Ancient Roman art and architecture

    709.37
    N224a
    2012

    Ancient Roman art and architecture

    Nardo, Don

    Greeks, Etruscans, and Romans; ampitheaters and other giant structures; aqueducts, water systems, and bridges; roads, the "true art of Rome"; painting, mosaics, and sculpture; ceramics, metalwork, and other crafts.

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    Ancient Rome

    609.37
    S671ar
    2010

    Ancient Rome

    Snedden, Robert.

    Looks at civilizations in the ancient and medieval worlds and explains the technological advances made in those times. Each book presents a clear insight into the way people lived and shows examples of how some of those ancient technologies have developed, and are still in use, in today's world.

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    The ancient world: 312 B.C.E.-476 C.E

    909
    S171a
    v.2
    2006

    The ancient world: 312 B.C.E.-476 C.E

    Chavalas, Mark W. (Mark William), editor.

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    The ancient world: C. 25,000-312 B.C.E

    909
    S171a
    v.1
    2006

    The ancient world: C. 25,000-312 B.C.E

    Chavalas, Mark W. (Mark William), editor.

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    The ancient world: earliest times to 1 BC

    930
    Ox98

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    The ancient world: prehistory - 476 C.E. II

    920.02
    S171b
    v.2
    2008

    The ancient world: prehistory - 476 C.E. II

    Saloway, Christina A., editor.

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    The ancient world: prehistory- 476 C.E. II

    920.02
    S171a
    v.2
    2008

    The ancient world: prehistory- 476 C.E. II

    Saloway, Christina A., editor.

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    The annals and the histories

    937
    T118

    The annals and the histories

    Tacitus, Cornelius.

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    Antiquity

    909
    S532g
    V.1
    2007

    Antiquity

    Sharpe Reference.

    Examine pivotal encounters, exchanges, and conflicts between cultures and civilizations that profoundly influenced the course of human history.

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    Antony and Cleopatra

    937.05
    G622a
    2015

    Antony and Cleopatra

    Goldsworthy, Adrian

    A masterfully told--and deeply human--story of love, politics, and ambition, Adrian Goldsworthy's Antony and Cleopatra delivers a compelling reassessment of a major episode in ancient history. In this remarkable dual biography of the two great lovers of the ancient world, Goldsworthy goes beyond myth and romance to create a nuanced and historically acute portrayal of his subjects, set against the political backdrop of their time. A history of lives lived intensely at a time when the world was changing profoundly, the book takes readers on a journey that crosses cultures and boundaries from ancient Greece and ancient Egypt to the Roman Empire. Drawing on his prodigious knowledge of the ancient world and his keen sense of the period's military and political history, Goldsworthy creates a singular portrait of the iconic lovers. "Antony and Cleopatra were first and foremost political animals," explains Goldsworthy, who places politics and ideology at the heart of their storied romance. Undertaking a close analysis of ancient sources and archaeological evidence, Goldsworthy bridges the gaps of current scholarship and dispels misconceptions that have entered the popular consciousness. He explains why Cleopatra was consistently portrayed by Hollywood as an Egyptian, even though she was really Greek, and argues that Antony had far less military experience than anyone would suspect from reading Shakespeare and other literature. Goldsworthy makes an important case for understanding Antony as a powerful Roman senator and political force in his own right.

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    Archaelogy and the biblical record

    220.93
    A456a
    2014

    Archaelogy and the biblical record

    Alpert, Bernard

    In the 6th century BCE, Jerusalem and Judea were destroyed by the Babylonians. This traumatic event created the need to construct and articulate a comprehensive past that would give meaningful context to the identity of the Israelites. New modes of communal organization and worship during this period formed the foundation of Second Temple Jerusalem and early Christianity.

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    The archaeology book

    930.1
    D748a
    2013

    The archaeology book

    Down, David

    Explores history and ancient cultures using three educational levels. Highlights techniques of the archaeologist and accounts of discoveries throughout the world.

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    The art of Mesoamerica: from Olmec to Aztec

    709.72
    M649a
    2014

    The art of Mesoamerica: from Olmec to Aztec

    Miller, Mary Ellen

    This expanded and full revised fifth edition of Mary Ellen Miller's classic book features a completely new chapter on Teotihuacan discussing the rulership and ethnicity of that powerful yet enigmatic city. Exciting new discoveries and ongoing research help clarify the links between the Olmecs and the Maya, while newly revealed paintings at Calakmul show Maya artists to have been both masters of convention and ready innovators. Vital new finds at the heart of the Aztec capital are still astounding students of Mexico, even as works from the Early Colonial period continue to reveal the complexity of the first decades under Spanish rule.

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    Aztec, Inca, and Maya

    609.72
    S671az
    2010

    Aztec, Inca, and Maya

    Snedden, Robert.

    Looks at civilizations in the ancient and medieval worlds and explains the technological advances made in those times. Each book presents a clear insight into the way people lived and shows examples of how some of those ancient technologies have developed, and are still in use, in today's world.

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    Babylon: Mesopotamia and the birth of civilization

    935
    K89ba
    2015

    Babylon: Mesopotamia and the birth of civilization

    Kriwwaczek, Paul

    Civilization was born eight thousand years ago, between the floodplains of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, when migrants from the surrounding mountains and deserts began to create increasingly sophisticated urban societies. In the cities that they built, half of human history took place. In Babylon, Paul Kriwaczek tells the story of Mesopotamia from the earliest settlements seven thousand years ago to the eclipse of Babylon in the sixth century BCE. Bringing the people of this land to life in vibrant detail, the author chronicles the rise and fall of power during this period and explores the political and social systems, as well as the technical and cultural innovations, which made this land extraordinary. At the heart of this book is the story of Babylon, which rose to prominence under the Amorite king Hammurabi from about 1800 BCE. Even as Babylon's fortunes waxed and waned, it never lost its allure as the ancient world's greatest city. Engaging and compelling, Babylon reveals the splendor of the ancient world that laid the foundation for civilization itself.

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    The Babylonians: an introduction

    935
    L525b
    2015

    The Babylonians: an introduction

    Leick, Gwendolyn

    For centuries, Babylon has been a symbol of the decadent city "par excellence", signifying a deep mistrust of urbanisation in general. In the Bible, the city has only negative connotations; and while later classical writers admired the city's size and splendour, they deplored some of its more unusual customs. Whatever the perspective, it was usual to take Babylon as standing for the whole of Mesopotamia civilization. The history of the Babylonians spans some 1800 years, from the time of Hammurabi, famous for his Law Code, to the time when Alexander's heirs ruled the Near East. Archaeological discoveries and cuniform tablets recovered from Babylonian cities give us an insight into the Babylonian people and their society, and their intellectual spiritual preoccupations.

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    Before Galileo: the birth of modern science in Medieval Europe

    509.4
    F854b
    2015

    Before Galileo: the birth of modern science in Medieval Europe

    Freely, John

    Histories of modern science often begin with the heroic battle between Galileo and the Catholic Church, which ignited the Scientific Revolution and gave way to the world-changing discoveries of Isaac Newton. Virtually nothing is said about the European scholars who came before. In reality, more than a millennium before the Renaissance, a succession of scholars paved the way for the exciting discoveries usually credited to Galileo, Newton, Copernicus, and others. In this book, physicist and historian John Freely examines the pioneering research of the first European scientists, many of them monks whose influence ranged far beyond the walls of the monasteries where they studied and wrote.

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    The birth of Christianity

    270.1
    N224b
    2011

    The birth of Christianity

    Nardo, Don.

    The religion that today has more members than any other in the world- Christianity- began as one of dozens of religious faiths practiced in the Roman Empire during its early centuries.

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    The birth of Islam

    297.09
    N224b
    2011

    The birth of Islam

    Nardo, Don.

    In the 600s CE in Arabia, a simple merchant named Muhammad told his family and friends that he had been visited by an angel from God. That divine messenger told him that he was a prophet who had been chosen to recieve and to preach a series of truths about the world and humanity. According to Muhammad, the angel then recited to him what became known as the Qur'an, which became the holy book of a new faith- Islam.

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    Bloody Mary

    92
    M393e
    2006

    Bloody Mary

    Erickson, Carolly.

    Recounts the tragic, stormy life of Mary Tudor, daughter of Henry VIII and Katherine of Aragon.

    Due 12/07/17

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    The borgias

    945
    M612b
    2015

    The borgias

    Meyer G. J.

    In the glorious and blood-drenched pageant known to us as the Italian Renaissance, the Borgias held center stage. History claims that Rodrigo Borgia bought the papal crown and prostituted the Roman Church; that Cesare Borgia, after becoming a teenage cardinal, turned into the most treachorous cutthroat of a violent time; and that Lucrezia Borgia, though beautiful, was also shockingly immoral. Today the members of this infamous dynasty remain immutable symbols of the depths to which humanity can descend. But do the Borgias deserve this notorious reputation? Grounding his narrative in exhaustive research and drawing from rarely examined key sources, acclaimed author G. J. Meyer brings fascinating new insight to the real people within the age-encrusted myth. Equally illuminating is the light he shines on the brilliant circles in which the Borgias moved and the thrilling era they helped to shape--a time of wars and political convulsions that reverberate to the present day.

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    Botticelli

    92
    B751c
    2005

    Botticelli

    Connolly, Sean.

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    A brief history of Egypt

    962
    G623b
    2016

    A brief history of Egypt

    Goldschmidt, Arthur, Jr.

    Egypt ranks among the countries of the world in its longevity as a civilization, the role it has played in history, and its strategic location. It is known, in part, for its historic influence over other civilizations and countries. This includes that of pharaonic Egypt on the ancient Hebrews, Mesopotamians, and Syrians and on classical Greece and Rome. Egypt has also figured prominently in the history of Islam. Modern Egypt is the most populous Arab state, and it has led the Arabs in education, literature, music, architecture, cinema, radio, and television. Its capital, Cairo, is the largest city in Africa and in the Arab world, and it hosts the headquarters of the Arab League. There are few, if any, Middle Eastern political issues--from the War on Terrorism to the Arab-Israeli conflict--that can be addressed without considering Egypt. This book explores Egypts broad political, economic, social, and cultural developments, from the mighty civilization of the past to the diverse cultural and political landscape of today, covering almost 6,000 years of history in a clear and concise manner. Specific coverage includes Ancient Egypt, Persian, Greek, Roman, and Arab Rule, Mamluk and Ottoman Rule, the British Occupation and Nationalist Resistance, the Palestine Question and World War II, Military Rule and Arab Nationalism, Arab Socialism, and contemporary Egypt.

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    Britain ad: a quest for Arthur, England, and the Anglo-Saxons

    942.014
    P973b
    2016

    Britain ad: a quest for Arthur, England, and the Anglo-Saxons

    Pryor, Francis

    Francis Pryor--one of Britain's most celebrated archaeologists--traces the story of Arthur back to its origins and overturns some common misconceptions. Demonstrating that key elements of the Arthurian legend are deeply rooted in prehistory (when swords and armour were thrown into lakes as a sacrifice), Pryor argues that the legend's survival mirrors a flourishing indigenous culture that endured through the Roman occupation of Britain and the so-called Dark Ages.

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    Caesar: life of a colossus

    92
    C128g
    2015

    Caesar: life of a colossus

    Goldsworthy, Adrian

    Tracing the extraordinary trajectory of the great Roman emperor's life, Goldsworthy covers not only the great Roman emperor's accomplishments as charismatic orator, conquering general, and powerful dictator but also lesser-known chapters during which he was high priest of an exotic cult, captive of pirates, seducer not only of Cleopatra but also of the wives of his two main political rivals, and rebel condemned by his own country. Ultimately, Goldsworthy realizes the full complexity of Caesar's character and shows why his political and military leadership continues to resonate some two thousand years later. In the introduction to his biography of the great Roman emperor, Adrian Goldsworthy writes, "Caesar was at times many things, including a fugitive, prisoner, rising politician, army leader, legal advocate, rebel, dictator . . . as well as husband, father, lover and adulterer." In this landmark biography, Goldsworthy examines Caesar as military leader, all of these roles and places his subject firmly within the context of Roman society in the first century B.C.

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    Charlemagne

    92
    C474w
    2015

    Charlemagne

    Wilson, Derek

    An absorbing biography of the great leader who was the bridge between ancient and modern Europe--the first major study in more than twenty-five years.

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    Chaucer's tale: 1386 and the road to Canterbury

    92
    C499c
    2015

    Chaucer's tale: 1386 and the road to Canterbury

    Strohm, Paul

    The middle-aged Chaucer did not enjoy the literary celebrity he has today--far from it. He was living quietly in London with a modest bureaucratic post and writing poetry for a small audience of intimate friends. But in one tumultous year, a series of personal and profesional crises set him on the road leading to the Canterbury Tales. The origin, hardship, and remarkable outcome of these events are the story this book will tell.

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    The children of Henry VIII

    92
    H525w

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    Chinese mythology

    299.5
    U84ch
    2014

    Chinese mythology

    Uschan, Michael V. 1948-

    "This new series from Lucent Books helps younger researchers understand the role of mythology in major historical cultures of the world. Each volume explores the origins and cultural importance of a specific mythology. Presented in an engaging narrative that explains mythology as a product of the culture that created it, each volume details the major characters, gods/goddesses, and themes reflected in the stories. Volumes also discuss the impact of the mythology on daily life at the time and throughout history. Ideal for middle- and high-schools, as well as public libraries, each Mythology and Culture Worldwide volume also features: A list and brief description of the major figures of the mythology, including a family tree illustrating their relationships; Five to six chapters exploring the mythology in detail; Informative sidebars highlighting related topics; Fact boxes providing at-a-glance information; Full-color maps, photographs and illustrations; A glossary of terminology; "For More Information" list of sources of additional information; A comprehensive index"-- Provided by publisher.

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    Chivalry

    394.7
    K26ch
    2016

    Chivalry

    Keen, Maurice

    Chivalry--with its pageants, heraldry, and knights in shining armour--was a social ideal that had profound influence on the history of early modern Europe. In this eloquent and richly detailed book, a leading medieval historian discusses the complex reality of chivalry: its secular foundations, the effects of the Crusades, the literature of knighthood, and its ethos of the social and moral obligations of nobility.

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    Chosen: Genesis through Deuteronomy

    221.6
    B638c
    #1
    2015

    Chosen: Genesis through Deuteronomy

    Blanco, Jack J.

    In its opening pages the story finds Adam and Eve swept into a dazzling world of vibrancy and energy. In awe, they are captivated by the tender love of Divinity walking and talking with them. But keep flipping the pages, and the story turns darker, more complicated. There is trouble: rebellion and deceit, battles and heartache. But through it all there is something greater, something beautiful.

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    City through time

    PIC
    S814c
    2008

    City through time

    Steele, Philip.

    Traces the development of a city from an ancient colony to a thriving metropolis, showing how people lived and worked.

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    City: a story of Roman planning and construction

    PIC
    M117ci
    2008

    City: a story of Roman planning and construction

    Macaulay, David.

    Text and black and white illustrations show how the Romans planned and constructed their cities for the people who lived within them.

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    Cleopatra: a life

    92
    C628s
    2015

    Cleopatra: a life

    Schiff, Stacy

    Her palace shimmered with onyx and gold but was richer still in political and sexual intrigue. Above all else, Cleopatra was a shrewd strategist and an ingenious negotiator. She was married twice, each time to a brother. She waged a brutal civil war against the first and poisoned the second; incest and assassination were family specialties. She had children by Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, two of the most prominent Roman commanders of the day. With Antony she would attempt to forge a new empire, in an alliance that spelled both their ends. Famous long before she was notorious, Cleopatra has gone down in history for all the wrong reasons; her supple personality and the drama of her circumstances have been lost. In a masterly return to the classical sources, Stacy Schiff boldly separates fact from fiction to rescue the magnetic queen whose death ushered in a new world order.

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    Colonial America to 1763

    973
    F142a
    #1
    2009

    Colonial America to 1763

    Purvis, Thomas L., editor.

    Portrays American history before the United States was established. Details their everyday lives, from the foods they ate to the places where they worshiped to the types of jobs they performed. Provides statistical tables, charts, maps, photographs, and illustrations.

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    The conquest of the Incas

    985.02
    H489c
    2004

    The conquest of the Incas

    Hemming, John.

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    Conquistador: Hernan Cortes, King Montezuma, and the last stand of the aztecs

    972.02
    L668c
    2015

    Conquistador: Hernan Cortes, King Montezuma, and the last stand of the aztecs

    Levy, Buddy

    In this astonishing work of scholarship, acclaimed historian Buddy Levy records the last days of the Aztec empire and the two men at the center of an epic clash of cultures perhaps unequaled to this day. It was a moment unique in human history, the face-to-face meeting between two men from civilizations a world apart. In 1519, Hernan Cortes arrived on the shores of Mexico, determined not only to expand the Spanish empire but to convert the natives to Catholicism and carry off a fortune in gold. That he saw nothing paradoxical in carrying out his intentions by virtually annihilating a proud and accomplished native people is one of the most remarkable and tragic aspects of this unforgettable story. In Tenochtitlan Cortes met his Aztec counterpart, Montezuma: king, divinty, commander of the most powerful military machine in the Americas, and ruler of a city whose splendor equaled anything in Europe. Yet in less than two years, Cortes defeated the entire Aztec nation in one of the most astounding battles ever waged.

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