Modern History: 1700's +

Posted by Admin on November 18, 2015

Showing 1-37 of 37 items

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    The Amistad Rebellion: an Atlantic odyssey of slavery and freedom

    326.0973
    R317a
    2016

    The Amistad Rebellion: an Atlantic odyssey of slavery and freedom

    Rediker, Marcus

    In this powerful and highly original account, Marcus Rediker reclaims the "Amistad" rebellion for its true proponents: the enslaved Africans who risked death to stake a claim for freedom. Using newly discoverd evidence and featuring vividly drawn portraits of the rebels, their captors, and their abolitionist allies, Rediker reframes the story to show how a small group of courageous men fought and won an epic battle against Spanish and American slaveholders and their governments. As a handful of self-emancipated Africans steered their own course for freedom, they opened a way for millions to follow.

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    Black Boy

    813.52
    W947b
    2016

    Black Boy

    Wright, Richard

    "Black Boy" is Richard Wright's powerful account of his journey from innocence to experience in the Jim Crow South. It is at once an unashamed confession and a profound indictment - a poignant and disturbing record of social injustice and human suffering.

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    Blood brother: Jonathan Daniels and his sacrifice for civil rights

    92
    D186b
    2016

    Blood brother: Jonathan Daniels and his sacrifice for civil rights

    Wallace, Rich & Wallace, Sandra Neil

    Jonathan Daniels, a white seminary student from New Hampshire, traveled to Selma, Alabama, in 1965 to help with voter registration of black residents. After the voting rights marches, he remained in Alabama, in the area known as “Bloody Lowndes,” an extremely dangerous area for white freedom fighters, to assist civil rights workers. Five months later, Jonathan Daniels was shot and killed while saving the life of Ruby Sales, a black teenager. Through Daniels’s poignant letters, papers, photographs, and taped interviews, authors Rich Wallace and Sandra Neil Wallace explore what led Daniels to the moment of his death, the trial of his murderer, and how these events helped reshape both the legal and political climate of Lowndes County and the nation.

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    The book of heroes: the 13-day struggle for the Alamo--and the sacrifice that forged a nation

    976.4
    D687b
    2016

    The book of heroes: the 13-day struggle for the Alamo--and the sacrifice that forged a nation

    Donovan, James

    On February 23, 1836, a Mexican army thousands of soldiers strong attacked a mackshift garrison of about two hundred Texas settlers--among them Davy Crockett, Jamies Bowie, and William Barret Travis. The Texans refused to surrender, fighting valiantly for their lives and for a free and independent Texas. For almost two weeks, the immense force laid seige to the fort, bombarding its occupants with a constant barrage of artillery fire. Then, in the predawn hours of March 6, the Mexican troops unleashed a final devestating assault. What happened next would become a legend. Drawing on fresh primary sources in American and Mexcian archieves, bestselling historian James Donovan offers and authoritatitve and thrilling account of this epic battle. A stirring tale of courage, redemption, and glory in the American West, "The Blood of Heroes" is a masterful work of scholarship and storytelling.

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    The Boston marathon bombing

    364
    B666b
    2016

    The Boston marathon bombing

    Bodden, Valerie

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    The cold war

    909.82
    D273c
    2016

    The cold war

    Day, Meredith

    Immediately following World War II, former allies the United States and the Soviet Union began an open yet restricted rivalry that became known as the Cold War and played out around the world until the Soviet Unions collapse in 1991. Many conflicts, such as the Chinese Civil War, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Arab-Israeli wars, acted as proxy wars for the U.S.-Soviet competition. Other major issues explored in this examination of the Cold War include Europe's Iron Curtain, the nuclear arms race, decolonization in Africa, and the spread of communism into Latin America and Southeast Asia.

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    The consequences of chaos: Syria's humanitarian crisis and the failure to protect

    956.9104
    F394c
    2016

    The consequences of chaos: Syria's humanitarian crisis and the failure to protect

    Ferris, Elizabeth & Kirisci, Kemal

    The context, causes, and consequences of Syrian displacement -- Syrian refugees: challenges to host countries and the international community -- Communities at risk inside Syria: the internally displaced, Palestinians, besieged and other trapped populations -- Syrian displacement and the international order.

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    Crips and bloods: a guide to an american subculture

    364.106
    C873c
    2016

    Crips and bloods: a guide to an american subculture

    Covey, Herbert C.

    This book provides a concise and engaging examination of the subculture of the Crips and Bloods--the notorious street gangs that started in Los Angeles, but have now spread throughout the United States.

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    Death of a gunfigher: the quest for Jack Slade, the West's most elusive legend

    978.0209
    R851d
    2016

    Death of a gunfigher: the quest for Jack Slade, the West's most elusive legend

    Rottenberg, Dan

    In 1859, as the United States careened toward civil war, the federal government's only northern link with California was a struggling stagecoach line plagued by outlaws and hostile Indians. Jack Slade, a former soldier and teamster, was hired to clean up the line's most dangerous division. Slade kept the stagecoaches running and helped launch the Pony Express, securing California and its gold for the Union and earning the nickname "The Law West of Kearny." But once Slade had restored the peace, his life descended into alcoholism, transforming him from a courageous leader and devoted husband into a quick-triggered drunk, who finally lost his life at the hands of vigilantes. Despite his notoriety, Slade's fascinating life has remained hidden behind half-truths and myths. In "Death of a Gunfighter: The Quest for Jack Slade, the West's Most Elusive Legend," journalist Dan Rottenberg assembles a lifetime of research to reveal the true story of one of America's great tragic heroes.

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    Destiny and power: the American odyssey of George herbert Walker Bush

    973.9280
    M479d
    2016

    Destiny and power: the American odyssey of George herbert Walker Bush

    Meacham, Jon

    In this brilliant biography, Jon Meacham, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author, chronicles the life of George Herbert Walker Bush. Drawing on President Bush's personal diaries, on the diaries of his wife, Barbara, and on extraordinary access to hte forty-first president and his family, Meacham paints an intimate and surprising portrait of an intensely private man who led the nation through tumultous times. From the Oval Office to camp David, from his study in the private quarters of the White House to Air Force One, from the fall of the Berlin Wall to the first Gulf War to the end of Communism, "Destiny and Power" charts the thoughts, decisions, and emotions of a modern president. This is an affecting portrait of a man who, driven by destiny and by duty, forever sought, ultimately, to put the country first.

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    The family romanov: murder, rebellion & the fall of imperial russia

    947.08
    F597f
    2017

    The family romanov: murder, rebellion & the fall of imperial russia

    Fleming, Candace

    He was Tsar Nicholas II of Russia: the wealthiest monarch in the world, who ruled over 130 million people and one-sixth of the earth's land surface, yet turned a blind eye to the abject poverty of his subjects. She was Empress Alexandra: stern, reclusive, and painfully shy, a deeply religioius woman obsessed with the corrupt Rasputin. Their daughters were the Grand Duchesses Olga, Tatiana, Marie, and Anastasia: completely isolated and immature, girls who wore identical white dresses and often signed joint letters as OTMA, the initials of their first names. Their only son was Tsarevich Alexei: youngest of the Romanovs, heir to the throne, a hemophiliac whose debilitating illness was kept secret from the rest of the world. Award-winnng author Candace Fleming brilliantly showcases the extraordinary lives of the royal family, from their opulent upbringings to the crumbling of their massive empire, and finally to their tragic murders. Using captivating photos and compelling first-person accounts throughout, Fleming deftly maneuvers between the extravagent lives of the Romanovs and the plight of Russia's poor masses--the starving peasant farmers, the factory workers toiling long hours for little pay, and the disillusioned soldiers fighting in the trenches of World War I. Readers will be transported back to a remarkable time when both a family and an empire came tumbling down.

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    Founding feuds : the rivalries, clashes, and conflicts that forged a nation

    973.3092
    A769f
    2016

    Founding feuds : the rivalries, clashes, and conflicts that forged a nation

    Arnon, Paul

    The founding fathers have been hailed for centuries as shining examples of men who put aside their own agendas to found a nation. But behind the scenes, there were more petty fights and fraught relationships than signatures on the Declaration of Independence. From the violent brawl between Roger Griswold and Matthew Lyon in the halls of Congress, to George Washington's battle against his slave Harry Washington, these less-discussed clashes bring to light the unpredictable and volatile nature of a constantly changing nation. Additionally, this gripping narrative delves deeper into the famous feuds, such as the fatal duel of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, and the many rivalries of Thomas Jefferson (which were as often personal as political). America's great forebearers fought with each other bitterly as our pliticians do today. "Founding Feuds" reveals the true natures of the founding fathers and how their infighting shaped our nation as much as their cooperation--sometimes for the better.

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    The freedom summer murders

    323.1196
    M681f
    2016

    The freedom summer murders

    Mitchell, Don

    Coinciding with the fiftieth anniversary of the Freedom summer murders, traces the events surrounding the KKK lynching of three young civil rights activists who were trying to register African Americans for the vote in June of 1964, three idealistic young men (one black and two white) were lynched by the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi. They were to register African Americans to vote as part of the Freedom Summer effort to bring democracy to the South. Their diappearance and murder cuased a national uproar and was one of hte most significant incidents of the Civil Rights Movement, and contributed to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Mitchell takes a comprehensive look at the brutal murders of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner, through to the conviction in 2005 of mastermind Edgar Ray Killen.

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    Frontier grit: the unlikely true stories of daring poineer women

    920.72
    M755f
    2017

    Frontier grit: the unlikely true stories of daring poineer women

    Monson, Marianne

    Discover the stories of twelve women who heard the call to settle the west and who came from all points of the globe to begin their journey. As a slave, Clara watched helpless as her husband and children were sold, only to be reunited with her youngest daughter, as a free woman, six decades later. As a young girl, Charlotte hid her gender to escape a life of poverty and became the greatest stagecoach driver that ever lived. As a Native American, Gertrude fought to give her people a voice and to educate leaders about the ways and importance of America s native people. These are gripping miniature dramas of good-hearted women, selfless providers, courageous immigrants and migrants, and women with skills too innumerable to list. Many were crusaders for social justice and women s rights. All endured hardships, overcame obstacles, broke barriers, and changed the world. The author ties the stories of these pioneer women to the experiences of women today with the hope that they will be inspired to live boldly and bravely and to fill their own lives with vision, faith, and fortitude. To live with grit.

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    George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: three royal cousins and the road to World War I

    92
    S323c
    2017

    George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: three royal cousins and the road to World War I

    Carter, Miranda

    In the years before the First World War, the great European powers were ruled by three first cousins: King George V of Britain, Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, and Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. Together, they presided over the last years of dynastic Europe and the outbreak of the most destructive war the world had ever seen, a war that set twentieth-century Europe on course to be the most violent continent in the history of the world. Through brilliant and often darkly comic portraits of these men and their lives, their foibles and obsessions, Miranda Carter delivers the tragicomic story of Europe’s early twentieth-century aristocracy, a solipsistic world preposterously out of kilter with its times.

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    Gunpowder girls: the true story of three civil war tragedies

    338.4
    A551g
    2016

    Gunpowder girls: the true story of three civil war tragedies

    Anderson, Tanya

    With thousands of men off fighting in the Civil War, the government hired women and girls--some as young as ten--to make millions of rounds of ammunition. Poor immigrant girls and widows paid the price for carelessness at three major arsenals. Many of these workers were killed, blown up and burned beyond recognition. As Steve Sheinkin did with The Port Chicago 50, Tanya Anderson in Gunpowder Girls tells an amazing war story that finally gives its subjects their due. Hidden history comes alive through primary-source research and page-turning narrative.

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    Heinrich Himmler

    92
    H848l
    2017

    Heinrich Himmler

    Longerich, Peter

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    Herber Hoover in the White House: the ordeal of the presidency

    973.9160
    R221h
    2016

    Herber Hoover in the White House: the ordeal of the presidency

    Rappleye, Charles

    Often dismissed as passive, unsympathetic, paralyzed by national events, Hoover in fact struggled to respond to the Great Depression. In "Herber Hoover in the White House," Charles Rappleye draws on fresh sources--including memoirs, diaries, troves of documents written by his cabinet and close advisors. They reveal a different Hoover than the often misunderstood president. In public Hoover was shy and reiring. In private he was intense, passionate, and sometimes furious--a man who perceived plots against him and raged against his enemies. He was laso more sophhisticated and proactive in economic policy than is often recognized, anticipating programs of strategic investment and quantitative easing that were deployed against the Great Recession eight years later. But his best efforts could not avert the national nightmare, and his technical efforts were quickly eclipsed by the political mastery of the man who became his nemesis--Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Hoover proved in the end to be the mirror image of Oliver Wendell Holme's assessment of FDR: Hoover had a first-class mind and a second-class temperment. His term in the White House was marked by dee personal disappointment as he struggled mightily, and often singl-handedly, to cope with the greatest econimic calamity of the modern era. here is the untold story of a president and a nation in crisis.

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    Hidden figures: the American dream and the untold sotry of the black women mathematicians who helped win the space race

    510.925
    S539h
    2017

    Hidden figures: the American dream and the untold sotry of the black women mathematicians who helped win the space race

    Shetterly, Margot Lee

    The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner. Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens. Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.

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    Hunting Eichmann: how a band of survivors and a young spy agency chased down the world's most notoriuous Nazi

    943.0860
    B297h
    2016

    Hunting Eichmann: how a band of survivors and a young spy agency chased down the world's most notoriuous Nazi

    Bascomb, Neal

    When the Allies stormed Berlin in 1945, Adolf Eichmann, the operational manager of the Final Solution, shed his SS uniform and vanished. Bringing him to justice would require a harrowing fifteen-year chase stretching from war-ravaged Europe to the shores of Argentina. "Hunting Eichmann" follows the Nazi as he escapes two American POW camps, hides out in the mountains, slips out of Europe on the ratlines, and builds and anonymous life in Buenos Aires. Meanwhile, concentration camp survivor Simon Wiesenthal's persistant search for the monster evolves into an international man-hunt that involves a bulldog West German prosecutor, and Argentinean Jew and his beautiful daughter, and a budding, ragtag spy agensy called the Mossad. Presented in a pulse-pounding, hour-by-hour account, the capture of Eichmann and efforts by Israeli agents to smuggle him out of Argentina for one of the twentieth century's most important trials bring the narrative to a stunning conclusion. Drawing on groundbreaking new information and interviews, recently declassified documents, and meticulous research, "Hunting Eichmann" is an authoritative, finely nuanced history that offers the intrigue of a detective story and the thrill of great spy fiction

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    In the shadow of liberty: the hidden history of slavery, four presidents, and five black lives

    920.0092
    D261s
    2016

    In the shadow of liberty: the hidden history of slavery, four presidents, and five black lives

    Davis, Kenneth C.

    An examination of American slavery through the true stories of five enslaved people who were considered the property of some of our best-known presidents

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    The khmer rouge's genocidal reign in Cambodia

    959.604
    L913k
    2016

    The khmer rouge's genocidal reign in Cambodia

    Lowery, Zoe & Bergin, Sean

    The appalling Cambodian genocide remains barely studied even to this day. Yet nearly two million Cambodians (around 20 percent of Cambodias population) died between 1975 and 1979 as a result of the dictator Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge Communist government. Innocent Cambodians were murdered, starved, and tortured. This fascinating book offers an overview of this tiny Asian countrys history, framing the events that led up to this tragic genocide. Readers will learn about the key players in the genocide, as well as the complications in obtaining justice in its aftermath.

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    Killing Kennedy: the end of camelot

    973.9220
    O63k
    2017

    Killing Kennedy: the end of camelot

    O'Reilly, Bill

    A riveting historical narrative of the shocking events surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy. In this #1 New York Times Bestseller, the anchor of The O'Reilly Factor recounts in gripping detail the brutal murder of John Fitzgerald Kennedy - and how a sequence of gunshots on a Dallas afternoon not only killed a beloved president but also sent the nation into the cataclysmic division of the Vietnam War and its culture-changing aftermath. In January 1961, as the Cold War escalates, John F. Kennedy struggles to contain the growth of Communism while he learns the hardships, solitude, and temptations of what it means to be president of the United States. Along the way he acquires a number of formidable enemies, among them Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, Cuban dictator Fidel Castro, and Alan Dulles, director of the C.I.A. In addition, powerful elements of organized crime have begun to talk about targeting the president and his brother, Attorney General Robert Kennedy. In the midst of a 1963 campaign trip to Texas, Kennedy is gunned down by an erratic young drifter named Lee Harvey Oswald. The former Marine Corps sharpshooter escapes the scene, only to be caught and shot dead while in police custody.

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    Killing patton: the strange death of world war II's most audacious general

    355.0092
    O63k
    2017

    Killing patton: the strange death of world war II's most audacious general

    O'Reilly, Bill

    Readers around the world have thrilled to Killing Lincoln, Killing Kennedy, and Killing Jesus--riveting works of nonfiction that journey into the heart of the most famous murders in history. Now from Bill O'Reilly, anchor of The O'Reilly Factor, comes the most epic book of all in this multimillion-selling series: Killing Patton. General George S. Patton, Jr. died under mysterious circumstances in the months following the end of World War II. For almost seventy years, there has been suspicion that his death was not an accident--and may very well have been an act of assassination. Killing Patton takes readers inside the final year of the war and recounts the events surrounding Patton's tragic demise, naming names of the many powerful individuals who wanted him silenced.

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    The new tsar: the rise and reign of Vladimir Putin

    947.086
    M996n
    2016

    The new tsar: the rise and reign of Vladimir Putin

    Myers, Steven Lee

    As the world struggles to confront a bolder Russia, the importance of understanding the formidable and ambitious Vladimir Putin has never been greater. On the one hand, Putin's many domestic reforms--from tax cuts to an expansion of property rights--have helped reshape the potential of millions of Russians whose only experience of democracy had been crime, poverty, and instability after the fall of the Soviet Union. On the other, Putin has ushered in a new authoritarianism--unyielding in its brutal repression of dissent and newly assertive politically and militarily in regions like Crimea and the Middle East. In this gripping narrative of Putin's rise to power, Steven Lee myers, former Moscow bureau chief of "The New York Times," recounts Putin's origins--from his childhood of abject poverty in Leningrad to his ascent through the ranks of the KGB, and his eventual consolidation of rule in the Kremlin. "The New Tsar" is a staggering achievement, a deeply researched and essential biography of one of the most imortant and destabilizing world leaders in recent history, a man whose merciless rule has inextricably bound to Russia's foreseeable future.

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    The Newton school shooting

    364
    bO97n
    2016

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    On a great battlefield: the making, management, and memory of Gettysburg National Military Park

    974.8
    M981o
    2017

    On a great battlefield: the making, management, and memory of Gettysburg National Military Park

    Murray, Jennifer M.

    Of the more than seventy sites associated with the Civil War era that the National Park Service manages, none hold more national appeal and recognition than Gettysburg National Military Park. Wlcoming more than one million visitors annually from across the nation and around the world, the National Park Service at Gettysburg holds the enormous responsibility of preserving the war's "hallowed ground" and educating the public, not only on the battle, but also about the Civil War as the nation's defining moment. Although historians and enthusiasts continually add to the shelves of Gettysburg scholarship, they have paid only minimal attention to the battlefield itself and the process of preesrving, interpreting, and remembering the bloodiest battle of the Civil War. In "On a Great Battlefield," Jennifer M. Murray provides a critical perspective to Gettysburg historiography by offering an in-depth exploration of the national military park and how the Gettysburg battlefield has evolved since the National Park Service acquired the site in August 1933. As Murray reveals, the history of the Gettysburg battlefield underscores the ocmplexity of preserving and interpreting a historic landscape. After a short overview of early efforts to preserve the battlefield by the Gettysburg Battlefield Memorial Association (1864-1895) and the United States War Department (1895-1933), Murray chronicles the administration of the National Park Service and the multitude of external factors--including the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Civil War Centennial, and recent sesquicentennial celebrations--that influenced operations and molded Americans' understanding of the battle and its history. Haphazard landscape practices, promotion of tourism, encouragement of recreational pursuits, ill-defined policies of preerving cultural resources, and the inevitable turnover of administrators guided by very different preservation values regularly influenced the direction of the park and the presentation of the Civil War's popular memory. By highlighting the complicated nexus between prservation, tourism, popular culture, interpretation, and memory, On A Great Battlefield provides a unique perspective on the Mecca of Civil War landscapes.

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    Pearl Harbor: 24 hours after [videorecording]

    DVD
    940.542
    P359
    2014

    Pearl Harbor: 24 hours after [videorecording]

    This momentous special reveals the untold story of the little-known, yet pivotal, events that occurred after President Roosevelt recieved the call that Pearl Harbor had been attacked on December 7, 1941. Author Steven Gillon has unearthed new evidence from the FDR library that shows the true panic that gripped the White House and shook the nation. Fearing an aerial attack in Washington, D.C., the underfunded U.S. Army assembled wooden sticks on the White House roof to resemble weapons from above. Concerned that a Japanese assassin might try to take Roosevel's life as they drove him to Congress to deliver his speech, the Treasury Department used a bullet-proof car confiscated from Al Capone. For the first time, HISTORY uncovers intimate details of how the President had to be placed in braces and straps to hold him up while he gave his speech. Features rarely seen footage including Japanese film of the attack-- "A day which will live in infamy.".

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    Rough riders: Theodore Roosevelt, hos cowboy regiment, and the immortal charge up San Juan Hill

    973.9110
    G226r
    2016

    Rough riders: Theodore Roosevelt, hos cowboy regiment, and the immortal charge up San Juan Hill

    Gardner, Mark Lee

    The explosion of the USS 'Maine" in Havana Harbor in February 1898 stunned the world and triggered a war between the United States and Spain. Congress authorized President McKinley to recruit a volunteer force to help drive the Spaniards out of Cuba, and from these men emerged the legendary Rough Riders, a mounted regiment drawn from America's western territories and led by the irrepressible Theodore Roosevelt. Its ranks included not only cowboys and other Westerners, but also several Ivy Leageuers and clubmen, many of them friends of "TR." Roosevelt and his men quickly came to symbolize American ruggedness, daring, and individualism. He led them to victory in the famed Battle of San Juan Hill, which made TR a national hero and cemented the Rough Riders' plac ein history. Now Mark Lee Gardner synthesizes previously unknown primary accounts--private letters, diaries, and period newspaper reports from public and private archives in Arizona, Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Massachusetts, New York, and Washington, D.C.--to breathe fresh lie into the Rough Riders and pay tribute to their daring feats and indomitable leader. Gardner also explores lesser-known aspects of the story, including the Rough Riders' relationship with the African America Buffalo Soldiers, with whom they fought side by side at San Juan Hill. Rich with action, violence, cmaraderie, and courage, "Rough Riders" sheds new light on the Theodore Roosevelt saga--and on one of the most thrilling chapters in American history.

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    Sergeant stubby: how a stray dog and his best friend helped win world war I and stole the heart of a nation

    940.4127
    B337s
    2016

    Sergeant stubby: how a stray dog and his best friend helped win world war I and stole the heart of a nation

    Bausum, Ann

    In this inspiring, all-American story, author Ann Bausum brings back to life one of the most celebrated dogs of the 20th century--Stubby. Bausum sifts facts form legend to revive the true adventures of a seeminly average, stump-tailed terrier turned national icon and World War I hero. After Stubby befriends Pvt. James Robert Conroy, the pair become inserparable as they embark on a journey carrying them across an ocean, into the trenches of France with the Yankee Division, and onto the path of history. Stubby's transformation from stray to stowaway to star reminds readers of the magic that can happen when a bond forms between a human and a dog. This definitive biography of Stubby benefits from exhaustive research that restores fractures story threads; unearths unpublished photographs; and reconnects Stubby, now on display at the Smithsonian, with Conroy's descendants. Stirring, humerous, heartwarming, and unbelievably true--Stubby's story is an inspiring read for everyone.

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    Spain in our hearts: Americans in the Spanish civil war

    946.0814
    H685s
    2016

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    They called theselves the K.K.K.: the birth of an american terrorist group

    322.4
    B292t
    2016

    They called theselves the K.K.K.: the birth of an american terrorist group

    Bartoletti, Susan Campbell

    Boys, let us get up a club. With those words, six restless young men raided the linens at a friend’s mansion, pulled pillowcases over their heads, hopped on horses, and cavorted through the streets of Pulaski, Tennessee in 1866. The six friends named their club the Ku Klux Klan, and, all too quickly, their club grew into the self-proclaimed Invisible Empire with secret dens spread across the South. This is the story of how a secret terrorist group took root in America’s democracy. Filled with chilling and vivid personal accounts unearthed from oral histories, congressional documents, and diaries, this account from Newbery Honor-winning author Susan Campbell Bartoletti is a book to read and remember. A YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Finalist.

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    US special ops: the history, weapons, and missions of elite military forces

    356.1609
    P987u
    2016

    US special ops: the history, weapons, and missions of elite military forces

    Pushies, Fred J.

    Longtime military journalist and author Fred Pushies tackles the entire history of US special operations from the French and Indian War right up to the War on Terror. The result is over 350 entries profiling a stunning array of weaponry, gear, vehicles, aircraft, missions, and legendary figures from all of America's elite fighting forces--the Green Berets, Rangers, SEALs, Marine Force Recon, US Air Force combat controllers, CIA Special Activities Division, and more. And each subject is accompanies by a photograph, making "US Special Ops" a comprehensive and informative survey of one of the most intriguing and popular subjects among today's military enthusiasts.

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    The Waco Standoff

    976.4
    G475w
    2016

    The Waco Standoff

    Gillam, Scott

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    Washington's farewell: the founding father's warning to future generations

    973.4
    A945w
    2017

    Washington's farewell: the founding father's warning to future generations

    Avlon, John P.

    The Farewell was published at the end of Washington's second term. It was reprinted in newspapers across the country. The President began the letter during his first term intending to retire but was persuaded by Hamilton and Jefferson to run for a second. By the end of that term he was the object of scurrilous press attacks and alarmed by the growing partisan bitterness. Fearful for the country's future, Washington pled with his countrymen to resist hyper-partisanship and foreign alliances. He called for unity among "citizens by birth or choice," defended religious pluralism, called for national education. His message to the country was urgent. Avlon describes how it was quoted by Jackson, Webster, Clay, Calhoun, and importantly by Lincoln in defense of the Union. Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson called on it for nation-building; Kennedy for Cold war; Reagan for religion. Clinton kept a copy on his Oval Office wall. In Washington's Farewell, Avlon offers important insight into Washington's his final public days, presenting not only a startling description of the perilous state of the new nation but a rare view of the man behind the usual face of a tranquil First Father.

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    Women of colonial America: 13 stories of courage and survival in the new world

    305.4097
    M647w
    2016

    Women of colonial America: 13 stories of courage and survival in the new world

    Miller, Brandon Marie

    In colonial America, hard work proved a constant for most women--some ensured their family's survival through their skills, while others sold their labor or lived in bondage as indentured servants or slaves. Yet even in a world defined entirely by men, a world where few thought it important to record female's thoughts, women found ways to step forth. Elizabeth Ashbridge survived an abusive indenture to become a Quaker preacher. Anne Bradstreet penned her poems while raising eight children in the wilderness. Anne Hutchinson went toe-t-toe with Puritan authorities. Margaret Hardenbroeck Philipse built a trade empire in New Amsterdam. And Eve, a Virginia slave, twice ran away to freedom. using a host of primary sources, author Brandon Marie Miller recounts the rolde, hardships, and daily lives of Native American, European, and African women in the 17th and 18th centuries. With strength, courage, resilience, and resourcefulness, these women and many others played a vital role in the mosaic of life in the North American colonies.

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